From a Pioneer Album - Minnie Pinkerton

Minnie Pinkerton, or
Minnie Pinkerton, or "Minnie Girl" as she was affectionately called by her mother.

Annie Dryer, mother of Minnie Pinkerton, who brought her family to Wyoming from New York in 1886
Annie Dryer, mother of Minnie Pinkerton, who brought her family to Wyoming from New York in 1886

Last updated: August 22, 2008

The Lusk Herald
September 27, 1951

by June Willson

Mrs. Minnie Pinkerton was born in Ulster County, N. Y., near the Catskill Mountains. She and her family, the Dryers, came to Nebraska where her four brothers were born. They stayed there seven years and moved west to Wyoming in 1886.

When they first came, they camped by a large rock in MacFarlane's pasture just northwest of Lusk. The folks slept in a wagon bed on the ground. Minnie slept on a tool chest, beside it.

Another couple camped right beside them and when the man was away with their wagon, the only shelter his wife had was four pitchforks with a sheet hung on top.

Some immigrants passed through and left a sheep wagon with one wheel missing. Minnie's folks blocked up the wagon so she and the neighbor lady could sleep there.

One night there was a waterspout. Mr. and Mrs. Dryer stayed in their wagon. Suddenly they heard a crash. The girl's wagon had gone over. Mr. Dryer got out and went over to see how they were fixed. They had put everything in a pile in the centcr and sat on it. When they finally went over to the family wagon, the water was up to Minnie's armpits.

They slept in wet clothes that night. The dog laid on the 2-months-old baby, and the next morning the only thing dry was the baby. A few days later there were about 700 Indians who went through town. Among them were Running Deer and Sitting Bull.

Miss Minnie Dryer was married to Wm. S. Pinkerton at the E. B. Willson home at Manville April 2, 1894. The wedding ceremony was performed by a Methodist minister, Mr. Davenport.

The building where she was married and the one where she lives are both made of grout. Grout is a form of rough cement, made of stone, gravel and lime. Walls made of this were 10 to 14 inches thick. These two buildings are proof of the durability of grout.

Life has its ups and downs and now with her family dropping in to see her occasionally, Mrs. Minnie Pinkerton reflects on her life as being full of things to do all the time.




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