The New Town of Lusk as Described By The Herald When It Was Two Weeks Old

Last updated: August 11, 2017

The Lusk Herald
May 28, 1936

From the Lusk Herald, Aug. 6, 1886

The Parties Who Have Built or Are Building, and the Business They Will Conduct

The new town is two weeks old, and already contains numerous large buildings.

Looking south from the depot, the first building on the west side of Main street is Collins Bros.’ lumber office, back of which stands their piles of lumber, which are being rapidly torn down and converted into business buildings.

We next see Cleveland Bros. saloon. The boys have purchased a lot and propose to stay in town.

South of them stands a portable drug store, where Dr. J.S. Hall has his office. The doctor is working up a good practice. And next a building is going up which will be occupied by Roberts & Co., as a saloon. They also moved from the old town and run a quiet orderly place.

J. M. Whitmore has a good building on the next lot, and a good stock of meat in the building.

Carter & Dickson’s place, run by agreeable Sam Sanders, is north of this.

Next stands a barber shop, and beyond it Sweeney & Stratton’s well-known saloon, and then another barber shop conducted by F. J. Kessel.

After which we reach the Palace Saloon, conducted by Minnick & Lambertson, two of Lusk’s finest business men.
We then reach Richards Bros. & Brown’s bank, which is conducted in a frame building by the genial Fred Rood, but which will soon occupy a fine tow-story brick. The firm also has banks at Chadron and Douglas.

Across Second street, on the other corner, stands a 24x80-foot building, in which Baker Bros are selling tons of groceries, flour and feed, boots and shoes, etc. These gentlemen rank among our best business men. The post office also occupies this building.

The pioneer clothiers, S. Adamsky & Co., occupy the next building, which is 24x60, and will soon be crowded with the finest stock in Eastern Wyoming. Mr. Adamsky knows how to buy right and is always ready to sell right.

Walker & Waters have a fine saloon in the next lot. It is 24x48. The boys are old cowpunchers, and are doing a good business.

Bostleman & Co. have their tent and stock of drugs on the rear of the lot of Walker & Waters, and are putting up a splendid building in front. They are here to stay and work up a permanent business and not take what money they can out of town. Trade with them and encourage those who are building up our city. Dr. W.R. Renwick’s office is at the Pioneer, and is securing a goodly share of patronage. He is a well read and experienced physician.

Next stands The Herald building, the first door of which is ornamented by the sign of Dr. M.C. Martin. He is a newcomer, but is fast making friends. His family will be here soon. In the other room this paper and job printing are produced. In the rear of the lot, Comer’s restaurant is receiving a deservedly large patronage.

W. F. Louger owns the next lot, and will shortly erect a furniture store thereon. South of which stands Goodwin & Dyer’s Meat Market. And beyond them comes Russell’s commission house.

On the next lot a large dry goods store is going up. It will be occupied by J.F. Patterson, of Lemars, Iowa. He is an experienced merchant and a square man-the kind we like to see locate and stay. Then comes a restaurant, and farther up and across the street, the popular Lusk Restaurant, conducted by Misses Eng & Larson. Going north from there, we reach the offices of E. E. Lonabaugh, an enterprising and successful land agent, attorney and notary public. Then a restaurant and lodging house, neatly conducted by Mrs. Loud.

On the south corner of Main and Second streets, A.L. Smails has opened out his extensive stock of hardware. He is experienced in the trade, having run a hardware store for many years down the line. He is getting there in good shape

The other corner is occupied by M.C. Anderson’s large hardware building, 24x60, and one of his tents-the other being still at the old town. Mr. A. has been very successful in Lusk and his customers are all his friends. He conducts a tin shop in connection with his business. John Cross & Co., wholesale liquor dealers, have just completed a new building further north, for their extensive trade. The Silver Cliff Exchange stands beyond this and receives a good patronage. The chop house standing next, is followed by a large hardware establishment of Peavey & Ralston, who also conduct a store at Douglas, They were very unfortunate in the last storm, as their tent was blown down and their large and varied stock badly damaged. They have always enjoyed a good trade, however, and will soon be in shape again.

The Wyoming Lumber Co. Has a neat office and large stock of lumber on West Second street. Mr. Rugg, the manager here, is full of business and has a lively trade. Kingman & Son have moved their large lumber yard near Redington’s livery barn. The Squire has been in the lumber business here for some years, and has any quantity of friends. Fred Redington has the finest livery barn in the Northwest, a special description of which will be found elsewhere. Bosse & Holmes’ stock of furniture will be found on Second street. They also buy bones. Minnick & Harshman have a temporary livery tent near the depot. The storm used them badly, but they will soon have a good barn built. James Hogle’s Pioneer Hotel is about three quarters of a mile west of the new town. At present it is the only first-class hotel we have. C. C. Keck & Bros., contractors and builders, office at the Wyoming lumber yard, and Dan Howe, our boss painter, may be found at the Pioneer drug store.

Frank S. Lusk, the godfather of our flourishing young city, has his office for the sale of town lots near the Wyoming lumber yard. His various other business interests call him away much more than his many friends wish, but he always has the interest of his namesake at heart.




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Debbie Sturman, Director
425 South Main Street, P O Box 510
Lusk, WY 82225-0510
Phone: 307-334-3490
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