Edward Orlando Barber



Photos courtesy of the Joshua Brackett Eagle Scout Project
Photos courtesy of the Joshua Brackett Eagle Scout Project

(September 17, 1890 - April 14, 1912)


The Lusk Herald
April 20, 1972


60 Years Ago - Barber, Edward

The Lusk Herald
April 18, 1912


The worst April storm in 30 years raged violently from early Saturday morning until late Sunday.

Bent on a mission of love, with feelings of anxiety for the safety of another, Edward Barber, eldest son of Mr. And Mrs. P.E. Barber of Lusk, went to his death in one of the fiercest blizzards which ever raged in this part of the state.

W. Blakely, a sheepherder for Charles Hitshew, lost his life in the late blizzard, his body being found about five miles north of Lost Springs.


The Lusk Herald
April 18, 1912
Tragic Death of Edward Barber


Bent on a mission of love, with feelings of anxiety for the safety of another, Edward Barber, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Barber, of Lusk, went to his death in one of the fiercest blizzards which ever raged in this part of the state.

Edward, his brother Charlie and their companion, Charlie Miller, a sheepherder, had been up a good part of Friday night looking after sheep at their ranch south of town; it rained heavily in the night, they were all wet when they turned into the sheep wagon in the mornig by which time it had begun to snow and blow. About eight or nine o'clock Miller went out in the raging blizzard to get some wood for the fire, and not returning in a couple of hours, Edward decided to go out to find him; before leaving he gave his brother Charlie strict instructions not to leave the wagon. Neither of them returning soon, Charlie got anxious and went out; about this time Miller had found his bearings and got back to the sheep wagon just in time to meet Charlie who had decided to begin a search for the other two; but poor Edward did not return and his companions were unable to help him; he evidently lost his way and wandered about from eleven o'clock Saturday forenoon until he dropped from sheer exhaustion; how far he traveled and how many times he retraced his steps will never be known; his body was found yesterday by Jack Tappen, one of a searching party which had been scouring the country to the south for several days.

When found Edward was lying on his back with no snow whatever upon his body, just as though he had walked and walked until his strenth gave out and he fell in his tracks. What the poor boy suffered both mentally and bodily during the long-drawn-out hours of his aimless wanderings no one can tell, but there is this assurance, he will reap the reward of his great self sacrifice.

Edward was 21 years of age, fine looking, unselfish, fearless, well educated and above reproach in character; he was well liked by all who knew him and his death is a terrible blow to this whole community.

The funeral will be held from the Congregational church Saturday afternoon.


The Lusk Herald
April 25, 1912
OBITUARY


Edward Orlando, eldest child of Phillip Edward and Virginia Barber, was born at Aspen, Colo., September 17, 1890. On April 7, 1891 he came with his parents to Lusk, Wyoming, near which place he departed his life April 14, 1912.

After a continued attendance of ten years at Lusk public school, in September 1908, he entered the University of Wyoming as a student, where he won the respect and esteem of his teachers and fellow students for his clean habits and earnest endeavor to improve his opportunities for a higher education. When at the end of two and a half years spent amid the activities of school life, he saw his father's need of him at home and appreciating the sacrifice that was being made for his sake, uncomplainingly laid aside his own wishes and returned to the ranch, taking upon himself ever the hardest share and much of the responsibility of the work incident to ranch life. It was this characteristic of thinking for others before himself that brought him to an untimely end.

Edward was 21 years, 6 months and 27 days old. That a life so full of promise and example should be called home in the very bloom of young manhood is the sorrow of the entire community. He leaves a father, mother, brother and two sisters to mourn his death.

The funeral service was held last Saturday afternoon at the Congregational church, which was thronged with sympathising friends. Rev. S. Burman Long officiated at the service which was appropriate and effective, the church choir rendering the music. All stores and offices in Lusk were closed and no sacrifice seemed too great to show the sympathy of all for the bereaved family.

Many beautiful floral tributes were sent and the casket was literally covered with flowers. The pall-bearers, all friends of Edward's boyhood, were Eugene Willson, Jr., Richard Gray, Walter Storrie, George Giinther, Willie Miller and Archie McFarlane.








| A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |


Genealogy Search

Type your search terms into the box below and his 'Search!' to begin searching the genealogy archives.




The Niobrara County Library Foundation, Inc. accepts online donations. Click to contribute via PayPal or credit/debit card.


Peruse our extensive genealogical archives, with entries sorted alphabetical by first and last name.
We are currently adding birth record information to the website, with entries sorted alphabetical by first and last name.
This resource provides an alphabetical listing of names, broken down by cemetery, of those buried in area cemeteries. This resource can assist you in locating the exact location of these grave sites.
Genealogy Links

Debbie Sturman, Director
425 South Main Street, P O Box 510
Lusk, WY 82225-0510
Phone: 307-334-3490
© 2014, Niobrara County Library